Join Alan Renouf to Talk about Open Source, APIs, SDKs & CLIs at VMworld

VMworld_2017_Register_Open_Source_ConferenceAre you interested in open source at VMware, software development kits (SDKs), vSphere PowerCLI or vSphere APIs? Come join Alan Renouf and his colleagues at these top VMworld open source sessions in the U.S. and Europe to learn more from the experts!

Alan Renouf is a Senior Product Line Manager at VMware focusing on APIs, SDKs, and CLIs. He is responsible for providing the architects and operators of private and public cloud infrastructure with the tool kits, frameworks and command-line interfaces they require to build a fully automated software-defined data center.

Here are Alan’s top VMworld open source sessions on APIs, SDKs & CLIs:

1. VMware & Chef: Leveraging the vSphere API Together

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: SER1906BU
Date: Monday, Aug. 28
Time: 1-2 p.m.

In this session, you will get an overview of the current VMware vSphere API and how to use it in your own data center. We will explore some of the different methods and tools available to a variety of audiences (vSphere administrators, developers, security admins, auditors) when automating against the vSphere API.

Leveraging the new vSphere representational state transfer (REST) API, we will show how to use the new Chef integration to build a virtual machine using a DevOps workflow.

Before that, though, we will start with a basic overview of Chef, going into the knife-vcenter plug-in, comparing it to the legacy knife-vsphere, and introducing a new test-kitchen integration. We will also touch on the InSpec framework to show the basic integration testing to confirm the virtual machine is in the desired state.

2. vSphere APIs with Alan Renouf & Kyle Ruddy

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: SER3036GU
Date: Monday, Aug. 28
Time: 4-5 p.m.

Join this discussion to learn about the vSphere APIs, how to use them, where to use them and more!

3. Hackathon Event: 15 teams Hack On Ideas!

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: VMTN6722U
Date: Monday, Aug. 28
Time: 8-11:45 p.m.

Sign-up for this session, Join a team or add a new idea and wait for others to join your team in this spreadsheet here.

You can coordinate with your fellow team members to determine what project you would like to do for your selected theme.

Register for VMware {code} and join the vmworld-hackathon group to discuss. This is sure to be a highlight for everyone who joins this year, just as much as it was last year.

4. Simplifying & Accelerating Your Multi-Cloud Strategy

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: IPC7001KU
Date: Tuesday, Aug. 29
Time: 2-3 p.m.

Alan Renouf on his top open source sessions at VMworld US and Europe, covering everything from vSphere APIs to Project Clarity.Join Alan, who will be presenting a must-see demo in this session with some of the key VMware employees.

The need to integrate multiple clouds is the new normal. We are living in a multi-cloud world and your cloud strategy should enable you to choose the right clouds for the right workloads at the right time. In this session, we’ll showcase how VMware’s rapidly expanding Cloud Services portfolio is helping customers optimize their cloud strategy by matching application requirements to the right cloud destinations—based on needs for cost savings, application agility, and timescales.

VMware executives will showcase our latest capabilities including VMware Cloud on AWS and Cross-Cloud Services. And hear from VMware customers using our cloud solutions to accelerate cloud transformation, extend existing data center investments, gain insights across cloud environments and achieve consistency in managing, securing, and delivering in multi-cloud environments.

5. VMware Open Source SDKs: From Getting Started to Web App In One Hour

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: SER1912BU
Date: Tuesday, Aug. 29
Time: 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Add to your VMworld Europe agenda: SER1912BE
Date: Tuesday, 12 Sept.
Time: 12:30-1:30 p.m.

In this session, you will get:

  • A brief introduction to the VMware vSphere software development kits (SDKs);
  • The history of when VMware first introduced programmatic interfaces; and
  • The recent fantastic enhancements made in this space.

You will learn how to:

  • Start with nothing;
  • Gain access to the vSphere automation SDKs;
  • Prototype simple API calls; and
  • Work with the SDKs and other free tools to produce your own simple web-based application.

We will also show how to further this project by using the other VMware open-source project, Clarity, all in one hour! This session is a must for vSphere admins, developers and DevOps teams looking to integrate with vSphere and further their education on the vSphere APIs, SDKs and CLIs.

6. The Power Hour: vSphere PowerCLI 10th Birthday Edition

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: SER1875BU
Date: Wednesday, Aug. 30
Time: 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Add to your VMworld Europe agenda: SER1875BE
Date: Tuesday, 12 Sept.
Time: 3:30-4:30 p.m.

In this special edition of the Power Hour, marking the 10th birthday of VMware vSphere PowerCLI, Alan and Luc will not only bring you new features and deep dives, but also show how far vSphere PowerCLI has come and how it has evolved over the past 10 years.

The deep dives will extend far beyond vSphere administration. Since vSphere PowerCLI, PowerShell and your learning have changed over the years, we will revisit some of the more memorable scripts that vSphere PowerCLI has spawned and see how they can be given a modern look.

The examples will demonstrate how to manage your VMware products with vSphere PowerCLI in a consistent and user-friendly way. This trip along memory lane from early beginnings to the current rich feature set will show you again why vSphere PowerCLI should be your preferred management and automation tool.

7. vSphere PowerCLI What’s New: The Next Evolutionary Leap Is Now

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: SER2529BU
Date: Wednesday, Aug. 30
Time: 4-5 p.m.

Get the latest scoop on PowerCLI Features and Capabilities with Alan and Jake! Acquiring the latest version of PowerCLI has never been easier! Learn about the latest improvements of PowerCLI Installation and Upgrade using the Powershell Gallery. We’re always adding new cmdlets to PowerCLI, and the latest release does not disappoint.

We’ll share the breadth of everything new you can do with PowerCLI including added vCenter functionality, VSAN functionality and even how these cmdlets can be used against Vmware Cloud on AWS. If all this wasn’t enough, we’ll also give an overview of multi-platform support and a technical preview of upcoming features. If you’re just getting started in PowerCLI or have already made a significant investment, you’ll want to be here!

8. VMware Cloud for AWS & the Art of Software-Defined Data Centers: API, CLI & PowerShell

Add to your VMworld U.S. agenda: LHC1748BU
Date: Thursday, Aug. 31
Time: 12-1 p.m.

Learn about the VMware Cloud for AWS API and how we can enable your automation goals through our representational state transfer (RESTful) API, along with our CLI and PowerShell integrations. This session will focus on automation and include demonstrations and code samples.

You can read more of Alan’s work at VMware Blogs and his personal blog Virtually everything is POSHable. You can also follow Alan on twitter at @alanrenouf.

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Source: Open Source @VMware

The Hillview Open Source Project: Big Data for the 99% of Enterprises

The Hillview open source project Hillview is still an early prototype, but we are excited by its capabilities for handling datasets with a billion rows interactively. We decided to keep this as an open-source project, to make it readily accessible to the maximum number of users and contributorsAs its motto says, the Hillview open source project is “big data for the 99% of enterprises.” And with the torrential influx of “things” entering businesses and homes everywhere, toolsets for big data exploration are in high demand. Fortunately for your IT and operations teams, Hillview can handle datasets with a billion rows—interactively.

Click over to the VMware OCTO Blog to read the full story, which dives into how Hillview accomplishes this amazing feat of big-data browsing with:

  • Simplified point-and-click interface.
  • Data visualization at the highest and deepest levels.
  • Fast response times, thanks to cloud-based availability.

“Hillview is still an early prototype, but we are excited by its capabilities. We decided to keep this as an open-source project, to make it readily accessible to the maximum number of users and contributors.”

—VMware Research Group on the VMware OCTO Blog

Check it out at github.com/vmware/hillview. You can also hear from the Hillview team directly in their VMworld U.S. panel discussion, Big Data for the 99% of Enterprise.

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How PostgreSQL Became an Overnight Success 30 Years in the Making

451Research recently estimated that around 30 percent of technology companies use PostgreSQL for core applications. This object-relational, open source database system for enterprises is known for its power, reliability and scalability. VMware engineers Peter Geoghegan, Kevin Grittner and Michael Paquier are some of the bright minds behind the growing success of PostgreSQL.

These three members of VMware’s PostgreSQL engineering team have a storied history with the project. Peter contributed sorting improvements, group commits and the UPSERT patch, which allows someone to automatically insert a row or update an existing one. Kevin added materialized views to PostgreSQL and works on contributions around SSI. Michael works on commitfest management, code reviews and bug fixes.

As Peter notes, “the popularity of PostgreSQL is generally considered to be on the up-and-up.” Users hail from a variety of industries and government agencies, which use PostgreSQL when high-volumes of data need to be quickly sorted into custom formats. Currently Peter is continuing his work with corruption detection in PostgreSQL and is researching index bloat and potential solutions. His most recent contribution was a code commit for amcheck.

Peter, Kevin and Michael have been active observers and contributors of PostgreSQL for years. Beginning as an academic project at UC Berkeley in the 1980s, PostgreSQL is now more popular than at any other point in its history. The PostgreSQL experts said a big part of that longevity is due to the tireless collaboration and trust within the open source community.

“This is almost like a lifestyle choice at this point, honestly. That’s really not an exaggeration,” Peter said, talking about his years of experience working on open source projects. If not for its open source contributors, Kevin says PostgreSQL would not be where it is today. “One of the advantages of open source is that if you need something and it’s not there, you can make it happen.”

Make it happen they did—over a lengthy period of time, that is. The prevailing joke is that PostgreSQL is an overnight success 30 years in the making. However, Peter, Kevin and Michael believe success was fueled by a slow-growing awareness leading to a recent surge in popularity.

PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL is based on well-established ideas when it comes to a database system. As an open source project, this familiar foundation is much easier for contributors to navigate. PostgreSQL was also consciously developed to make all enhancements more seamless than traditional methods of development. This enables different people with different needs to utilize PostgreSQL.

For example, a set of Russian scientists needed a new index for their astronomy work with complicated inputs documenting work in multiple dimensions. They were able to write their own code and plug it into PostgreSQL because of the project’s sound framework. They contributed their indexing code to the open source community, and now others are using it for more terrestrial purposes, like running a search for the closest pizza restaurants near someone.

Many of PostgreSQL’s features carved out a path for its success, but picking a favorite is a difficult task for the team. Peter likens this to picking the favorite feature of your car; how can you possibly choose? However, Michael is fond of one of PostgreSQL’s newest offerings. “I like a lot of the work that’s been put into a new feature called SCRAM (Salted Challenge Response Authentication Method), which is the new authentication protocol,” he said. He’s one of the authors of the feature, which has been in development for four years.

Another reason for PostgreSQL’s success lies in the collaborative, dedicated and professional open source community. Peter, Kevin and Michael are quick to praise the community. For Michael, PostgreSQL was his first foray into the open source world. “[It] got me introduced to the basics of the community and the basic way of doing things.” Michael now ranks third among contributors of patches (or fixes) for the program.

Peter and Kevin, meanwhile, are veterans of the open source community. Peter believes the community is driven by a long-term outlook on advancing the project. Kevin is quick to point out the camaraderie in the community and around PostgreSQL. In fact, many of the features added to PostgreSQL came from contributors sharing beers during industry conferences.

The excitement around this project has lured many more collaborators, with approximately 200 developers currently working on PostgreSQL. The recent growth in adoption of the database is inspiring even more developers to join the community. The community is so involved, in fact, that an emerging problem is accommodating the growing number of patches people want to contribute.

Given this influx, sufficiently reviewing the volume of contributions is becoming a challenge. But when it comes to open source projects like PostgreSQL, a surplus of inspired participation is not a bad problem to have.

Version 10 of PostgreSQL will be available in September. Stay tuned to the VMware Open Source blog and be sure to follow @VMWOpenSource for more updates on VMware’s contributions to the open source community.

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Source: Open Source @VMware

Spork! An Open Source Fork Utensil

Recently at the Open Source Summit in Tokyo, I was on the kernel panel where someone asked us, “Why hasn’t Linux forked?” The entire panel looked at each other, sorta laughed and we all said the same thing:

“What do you mean? It has forked several times, and it is still forking!”

A Little History

The term “fork” in software is similar to a fork in the road: one base and two branches with that common base. Back in the ’80s, Unix was a popular alternative to the mainframe. Unix has its roots back to research done by MIT, Bell Labs and General Electric. In the 70s and 80s, Unix was used by several universities and was sold off to different commercial startups (AIX, Solaris, HP-UX, Xenix and more). Eventually, Unix had several different proprietary flavors. All were able to do mostly the same operations, but each had their own flavor and were not totally compatible with the other.

Eventually the different flavors (forks) of Unix created its downfall.

Unix was cheaper than a mainframe, but was much more expensive than a common PC. When a customer needed to use Unix, they needed to decided which fork to use, and that also usually meant lock-in to a specific vendor. One might believe that customer lock-in is good for the vendor, but this can have adverse effects. When another fork of Unix has a new feature that would benefit the customer better, they could not easily switch to that version; they may also depend on some feature of the fork of Unix they are currently using.

The different forks of Unix were always trying to add more value than their competitors. This split the user base. It also allowed for a much less expensive operating system that ran on the common PC to start to eat away at their market share. As the PC became more powerful, it became less of a need to use the hardware that Unix ran on. Customers started to move toward the cheaper alternative.

I was first introduced to Linux in 1996. That was also when I was first introduced to an open source license. The Linux distribution I was reading had a clause saying, “Most software licenses prevent you from sharing the applications. Our license encourages you to share.” That was quite a culture shock to me, as I have never heard of such a thing.

Now, open source licenses have been around much longer than Linux, but it was Linux that brought it to the mainstream. Linux was not a clone of Unix, although many people believed that it was and they believed it would suffer the same fate of Unix. Linux was not a fork of Unix. It was written from scratch, but it tried to implement the same Application Programming Interface (API) as Unix. People would incorrectly call Linux another Unix, because it looked the same. But it had a completely different code base and license, one that not only allowed the sharing of the code, but made it a requirement if you ever forked Linux and distributed it.

I would say that Linux started to become noticed by the industry in 1998.

Related: The Road to Real Time Linux

Linux & Open Source Forks

I was asked by the company I worked for at the time to give a presentation to explain Linux and this open source license. Several people told me at the time that Linux will suffer the same fate as Unix, as it allows for forks. I told them that forks will only make Linux stronger. The reason was that the forks can freely merge when, in a proprietary environment, that is prohibited.

In a proprietary environment, when you have a fork, each fork will try to give its own value-add and be unique from the rest. If one fork creates something that the others can’t, it will have an advantage. Those that are not locked into the other forks can move. But then the customers that are locked in will be at a disadvantage.

In an open source environment, when you have a fork, and one of the forks produces a great feature that beats the features of the other forks, their customers can ask for that feature. Since the code is freely available and free to use, the other forks can simply merge that code into its own fork and improve. In fact, whenever any fork improves the code, the other forks can take advantage of it, and all forks become a better project. As stated above, forks will only make Linux stronger.

Every Distribution Has its Own Fork of Linux

Sometimes, it takes forking Linux to prove that a feature is worth merging. If you can add a feature to Linux and get it accepted in one of the forks, you can show its usefulness as people will start asking for it. The Android phone uses its own forked Linux kernel. Several of the Android features came into the Linux mainline exactly because of this. Android was able to show that it had millions of users of a specific feature. That’s pretty convincing to get a feature into the Linux kernel.

The Linux kernel isn’t the only open source project that has examples of improvements via forks. The GNU C Compiler (gcc) had an instance where the developers disagreed on the future of the project, and the developers created a true fork. The two projects remained separate for years.

One would think that something like that would cause the project to fail. Eventually, the two found a common ground and merged back into a single project—one that was better than either of the two separate projects.

I like to think that open source does not fork, but instead it “sporks.”

Spork! An Open Source Fork Utensil

Image courtesy of Flickr user goblinbox: https://www.flickr.com.

If you know of the spork, it is a spoon and a fork combined as one, where it looks like a spoon with short prongs sticking out of the end. A true fork has prongs that stay separated all the way down to the base. This is true with proprietary software. When a fork occurs, it never merges back.

An open source fork, will only stay separated for a small duration, and then it merges back together that has more features (like a spork has the features of both a spoon and fork).

Forks are dangerous and can kill a proprietary project. But nothing has ever been killed by a spork.

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Source: Open Source @VMware

The Inspiration Behind Open Source Project Harbor

A few years ago, we created Project Harbor, an open source enterprise-class registry. Much to my surprise and pleasure, many people adopted Project Harbor for its utility, cultivating its own community. Today, I wanted to share more about how Project Harbor started.

Meet the Project Harbor Team!

Project Harbor

Project Harbor is an enterprise-class registry server that stores and distributes Docker images. Harbor extends the open source Docker Distribution by adding the functionalities usually required by an enterprise, such as security, identity and replication.

The Inspiration Behind Project Harbor

Based out of the VMware offices in China, I am the chief architect for the R&D team. I’ve always been drawn to the incubation of projects in emerging technology. In fact, my primary technology passions are centered on containers, blockchain and the internet of things (IoT). I believe collaboration powers innovation, and for this reason I’ve been involved in many open source projects.

When I attended container meetups and conferences in early 2014, I often heard people complaining about container image management challenges. They usually created various hacks or workarounds to solve their problems. When I saw pain points like these, I had a gut feeling there would be a great opportunity to create a solution addressing these challenges. Shortly after these discussions, we started a side project for managing container images. And that’s where Project Harbor began.

Why We Chose to Open Source Project Harbor

Originally, we dogfooded our project within the VMware China R&D Center. We used Harbor in a few internal projects and received positive feedback from our teams. In March 2016, we ultimately decided to open source Project Harbor on Github for larger adoption and more feedback.

How We Landed On the Name “Harbor”

We chose a name related to containers. Harbor is a place where containers are loaded on or unloaded from ships. Moreover, the word “Harbor” is simple and can be easily pronounced and remembered, making it a strong choice for project promotion.

The People Behind Project Harbor

At the beginning, only about six people were involved with the project—mostly engineers and interns in our Advanced Technology Center (ATC) team at VMware China R&D. Gradually, community users started to join forces with us, collaborating to help improve the project. Currently, there are approximately 50 contributors, and about two-thirds are outside of VMware.

Project Harbor Momentum

Since Project Harbor was open sourced last year, it gained significant traction in terms of adoption and new contributors. I think Project Harbor has seen substantial momentum due to many factors. First, it hit the pain points and solved many container user problems. Second, Harbor is open source and has an open community mindset; our actions reflect constant user feedback and suggestions to ensure improvement. We also work with partners in the ecosystem to build products or create solutions using Harbor. Third, we promoted Harbor through social media channels, like WeChat, blogs and Twitter.

I look forward to sharing more about Project Harbor, answering any community questions and sharing my thoughts on other open source projects in the future.

Have questions? Leave us a comment below. Follow @VMWOpenSource to stay up to date on VMware’s contributions to the open source community.

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Source: Open Source @VMware

Meet the Team: VMware Open Source Technology Center

The fastest way to innovation is through collaboration. The VMware Open Source Technology Center team is an integral part of fostering that collaboration within VMware and the broader tech community. From the inside out and back again, we are excited to introduce you to our team of open source experts—all of whom pack a wealth of experience and a passion for collaboration and contribution.

Darren Hart, Director, Open Source Architect

Learn about the talented experts on the VMware Open Source Technology Center team.Darren has worked “in and around the Linux kernel” throughout his career, andhe is the Linux kernel maintainer for x86 platform drivers. At VMware, Darren continues his open source contributions to the Linux kernel and other projects, while also working with internal teams on open source development methodologies and best practices. Darren is an expert speaker at conferences across the globe on topics ranging from PREEMPT_RT to Embedded Linux and Functional Safety.

Before joining the VMware team, Darren served as the MinnowBoard program architect at Intel and led IBM’s Real-Time Linux development team. He also worked on embedded Linux-build systems, where he contributed to board support packages, kernel configuration management, driver development and the ACPI specification.

Follow Darren on Twitter @dvhart_ and on Google+ +DarrenHart.

John Hawley, Open Source Developer

John joined VMware from The Linux Foundation. He has been involved in the open source space for a long time, his work hits above the kernel and below the user space. John works in what he describes as an odd realm where the inner workings of things, the base infrastructure for things, exists. He spends most of his day tracking down bugs and fixing them, and most of what he touches is infrastructure related. Currently, John focuses a lot of his bug hunting energy into Ktest.

John ran kernel.org for many years, which serves as a central hub for kernel development. Now, when he’s not tracking down bugs to fix, he’s working on open hardware and IoT projects.

Follow John on Twitter @warty9.

Nisha Kumar, Open Source Engineer

Nisha is the newest addition to the VMware Open Source Technology Center, currently focusing on tools for Docker container users. Before joining the VMware team, Nisha worked at Jaguar Land Rover, focusing on Qt/QML programming for car infotainment, continuous integration and delivery automation, platform integration, system architecture. Other assignments included writing code in C++, Java and Python.

In a previous life, she worked on Intel’s Android project, where she learned everything she knows about open source.

Follow Nisha at nishakm.github.io/.

Steven Rostedt, Open Source Developer

Before joining VMware, Steven worked at RedHat for 10 years on the Real-Time Linux kernel. Since 2004, Steven worked on slowly turning the Linux kernel into a real-time operating system. Now he dabbles in other areas, such as working on the user interface, maintaining patches and continuous development for Ftrace, the official tracer of the Linux kernel. People use his code to trace what is happening within the Linux kernel when their applications are running.

Outside of his 9 to 5, Steven is actively involved in the open source community. Currently, Steven serves on the Technical Advisory Board (TAB) for The Linux Foundation, which is the face of the Linux kernel for the foundation. From working for the Linux Kernel Summit program committee to speaking at a variety of conferences and panels—Open Source Summit Japan, OpenIoT & ELC Europe and more—Steven takes his collaborative spirit beyond software contributions.

Follow Steven on Twitter @srostedt.

Leading the Open Source Charge

Building technology from which others can benefit and build upon is immensely important to our team and the industry as a whole. In short, we want to be good open source citizens, and we are thrilled to have open source experts like Dirk Hohndel and the VMware Open Source Technology Center team leading the charge.

Stay tuned to the VMware Open Source Blog and @vmwopensource for more people and project features to come.

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Learn More About Open Source at VMworld 2017!

VMworld_2017

Interested in learning more about VMware’s involvement in open source? VMworld 2017, the biggest IT event of the year, is quickly approaching in Las Vegas and Barcelona and will offer you plenty of opportunities to hear about open source. From new open source projects like Clarity, to open source compliance and its impact on IT, you will have plenty to choose from.

Here’s a brief look at some of the many sessions offered.

VMware & Open Source: Compliance, Quality & Viability

Companies innovate at a rapid pace and deliver features to market faster than ever. The collaboration of ideas and code, open source software is crucial to keeping pace and accelerating innovation.

VMware encourages and embraces the responsible use of open source throughout the organization. What is “responsible” use? Dirk Hohndel, chief open source officer; Meng Chow, staff open source program manager; and Norman Scroggins, senior open source program manager, will discuss how VMware evaluates the open source components used in products, how VMware deals with security and compliance and the challenges of maintaining stability while staying close enough to upstream.

Find out more about VMware’s Open Source Program Office and integrative approach towards open source compliance, quality, and viability.

  • VMworld U.S. Session Code: FUT1226BU
  • VMworld Europe Session Code: FUT1226BE

Open Source at VMware: A Key Ingredient to Our Success & Yours

Open source components are part of practically every software product or service today. VMware products are no exception. And increasingly, IT departments are presented with many application roll-out requests, including large, open source components as part of the infrastructure on which they rely.

From OpenStack and Docker to Kubernetes and beyond, open source is a reality of the enterprise environment. VMware invests in open source both as a user of many components (and contributor to many of those projects) and as a creator of many successful open source projects such as Open vSwitch, Harbor, Clarity and many more.

In this session, Dirk Hohndel will talk about the what, the why, and the how behind VMware’s engagement in open source—the vision and strategy and why all this is critically important for customers.

  • VMworld U.S. Session Code: LDT1844BU
  • VMworld Europe Session Code: LDT1844BE

Simplifying Your Open Source Cloud with VMware

Open source or VMware? Clearly, you can’t have both, right? Wrong.

As open source, cloud-based solutions continue to evolve, IT leaders are challenged with the adoption and implementation of large-scale deployments, such as OpenStack and network function virtualization, from both a business and technical perspective.

Dirk Hohndel and Edward Blackwell, principal systems engineer, will discuss how VMware’s solutions can simplify existing open source innovation. Learn how doing so, you can achieve new levels of operations, standardization (app compatibility) and delivery of enterprise support.

  • VMworld U.S. Session Code: FUT3076BU
  • VMworld Europe Session Code: FUT3076BE

VMware Open Source SDKs: From Getting Started to Web App in One Hour

In this session, Alan Renouf, senior product line manager, and Steve Trefethen, SDK manager, will give you a brief introduction to VMware vSphere software development kits (SDKs), the history of when VMware first introduced programmatic interfaces and recent enhancements made in this space.

You will learn how to start with nothing, gain access to the vSphere automation SDKs, prototype simple API calls and, finally, work with the SDKs and other free tools to produce your own simple web-based application. Alan and Steve will also show you how to further this project by using another VMware open source project, Clarity, all in one hour!

This session is a must for vSphere admins, developers and DevOps teams looking to integrate with vSphere and further their education on the vSphere APIs, SDKs, and CLIs.

  • VMworld U.S. Session Code: SER1912BU
  • VMworld Europe Session Code: SER1912BE

Do any of these sessions spike your interest? The content catalog is now live for both VMworld U.S. and Europe. Open the VMworld U.S. Catalog or the VMworld Europe Catalog and enter the session code to learn more.

Peruse the catalog for a comprehensive list of breakout sessions, hands-on labs, group discussions and more. Mark your favorites now, and stay tuned for the release of the VMworld Schedule Builder.

VMworld_2017_Register_Open_Source_Conference

If you’re not registered for VMworld yet, you can register here for either VMworld U.S. or VMworld Europe.

Have questions about these sessions? Leave us a comment below. Follow @VMWOpenSource to stay up to date on VMware’s contributions to the open source community.

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Source: Open Source @VMware

Looking Back at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen in China

LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen (LC3) came to China for the first time last week at the China National Convention Center in Beijing.

LC3 enables attendees to collaborate, share information and learn about the newest and most interesting open source technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud technologies, networking, microservices and more. The events also provide insight into how to navigate and lead in the open source community.

Expert speakers from VMware shared their open source insights and technical knowledge at the event.

Dirk Hohndel, VMware Chief Open Source Officer, had an interview with Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux and Git. According to Linus, the advantage of participating in open source is more opportunities to interact and share with people in this field and try something that you had always been interested in. Read this great recap of their interview via Linux.com: Linus Torvalds Explains How Linux Still Surprises and Motivates Him.

Ben Pfaff, Principal Engineer, and Justin Pettit, Senior Staff Engineer, delivered a speech on the Open vSwitch and OVN projects. In this presentation, they provide an overview of the current state of the projects and their future plans.

Ben and Justin also had another speech in this conference, entitled “The Business Reality of Building Open Source: What We Learned from OVS and OVN.” In this presentation, they discussed quite a few questions that commonly arise in supporting open source projects within companies that primarily develop closed-source software.

Henry Zhang, Chief Architect of R&D China, gave a speech on Efficient and Secure Container Image Management in Enterprise. In this presentation, he focused on the management of container images and reviewed the challenges to enterprises and discussed how to manage container images efficiently and securely to meet the need of enterprises.

Challenges addressed included RBAC (Role Based Access Control), image consistency, large scale image distribution, image replication and promotion and high availability of registry. The open source registry Project Harbor was introduced as part of the solution to these challenges.

Tiejun Chen, Staff Engineer, delivered a speech of Unikernalized Linux. In his speech, Unikernels are facing three major challenges:

  1. Compatibility with existing applications.
  2. Lack of production support (e.g. monitoring, debugging, logging).
  3. Lack of compelling use case.

Tiejun reviewed their investigations and exploration of if and/or how they can convert Linux as Unikernel to eliminate these significant shortcomings, plus some explorations of coordinating and cooperating with hypervisor.

VMware’s Booth at LC3

VMware also had a booth to promote open source projects, including Harbor, Clarity and Admiral. The booth attracted 200-plus visitors, who came over to have a deep interaction with our onsite engineers. They discussed the VMware technology in the open source area.

The conference gave us an opportunity to promote open source products to the China developer community, and we are looking forward to the opportunity to engage with many more open source developers at events throughout the rest of 2017.

 

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Source: Open Source @VMware

Open Source Projects at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China

LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China (LC3) will take place in Beijing next week, June 19-20. The event offers attendees the opportunity to collaborate, share information and learn about new and interesting open source technologies. Attendees to this year’s conference can examine how Linux, containers, the cloud, networking, and microservices can work with open sources technology. Attendees will also learn how to navigate and lead in the open source community.

We’re excited to be part of this great open source event, with experts from our technical teams contributing to four unique sessions and our open source team from the Harbor project onsite at the VMware booth. The team will be showcasing Harbor, Admiral and Clarity – stop by and learn how to become part of our thriving open source community.

Here’s what’s on our agenda:

The Open vSwitch and OVN Projects
When: Monday, June 19 at 13:35 – 14:05
Experience level: Beginner
Who: Justin Pettit, Lead Developer, Open vSwitch & OVN, VMware and Ben Pfaff, Principal Engineer, VMware

About: Open vSwitch (OVS) is a multilayer open source virtual switch. OVS is designed to enable massive network automation through programmatic extension, while still supporting standard management interfaces. OVN is a new network virtualization project that brings virtual networking to the Open vSwitch user community. OVN includes logical switches and routers, security groups and L2/L3/L4 ACLs, implemented on top of a tunnel-based overlay network.

In this presentation, you’ll receive an overview of the current state of the projects and future plans, such as:

  • The current state of the Linux, DPDK and Hyper-V ports
  • A status update on a portable BPF-based datapath
  • The latest stateful and OpenFlow features available in OVS
  • Performance and debugging enhancement to OVN
  • OVN features under development such as ACL logging and encrypted tunnels

Unikernelized Linux
When: Monday, June 19 at 15:35 – 16:05
Experience level: Intermediate
Who: Tiejun Chen, Staff Engineer, VMware

About: Unikernel is a novel software technology that links an application with the operating system (OS) in the form of a library and packages them into a specialized image that facilitates direct deployment on a hypervisor. Comparing to the traditional virtual machine (VM) or the recent containers, Unikernels are smaller, more secure and efficient, making them ideal for cloud environments. There are many open source projects like OSv, Rumprun and so on. But why haven’t these existing unikernels gained mass popularity? We think Unikernels are facing three major challenges:

  1. Compatibility with existing applications.
  2. Lack of production support (e.g. monitoring, debugging, logging).
  3. Lack of compelling use case.

In this presentation, you’ll learn about our investigations and exploration of how we can convert Linux as Unikernel to eliminate these significant shortcomings, plus some explorations of coordinating and cooperating with hypervisor.

Efficient and Secure Container Image Management in Enterprise
When: Tuesday, June 20 at 11:00 – 11:30
Experience level: Intermediate
Who: Haining Zhang, VMware

About: As container technology becomes widely adopted in the industry, containerized applications pose new challenges to administrators. The management challenges come from two aspects: the dynamic container runtime and the static container images.

In this presentation, you’ll learn how to address the management of container images and evaluate the challenges to enterprises. We will discuss how to manage container images efficiently and securely to meet the need of enterprises. Challenges to be addressed include Role Based Access Control (RBAC) of images, image consistency, large scale image distribution, image replication and promotion and high availability of registry.

The open source registry Harbor will be introduced as part of the solution to these challenges.

The Business Reality of Building Open Source: What We Learned from OVS and OVN
When: Tuesday, June 20 at 11:00 – 11:30
Experience level: Any
Who: Justin Pettit, Lead Developer, Open vSwitch & OVN, VMware and Ben Pfaff, Principal Engineer, VMware

About: A number of questions commonly arise in supporting open source projects within companies that primarily develop closed source software, such as:

  • How many resources should we allocate?
  • Are we just enabling our competitors?
  • What, if anything, should we keep proprietary?
  • What are the implications of the license being used?
  • What should we expect in terms of community contributions?
  • How do we balance the needs of the community versus the company?

As founding members of the Open vSwitch and OVN projects, the presenters helped answer these questions at both an early stage startup and a large established company. In this presentation, you’ll learn how they’ve navigated the often-conflicting goals of open source projects and our companies.

You can also find VMware’s Harbor team onsite at the VMware booth. Stop by to learn more about Harbor, Admiral and Clarity and become part of our growing open source community.

Not attending the event? Stay tuned here on the VMware Open Source Blog for more details and blogs from the speakers.

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Source: Open Source @VMware